How much money finance YouTube creators make — from their monthly incomes to what they get paid for 100,000 views

  • YouTube's Partner Program lets creators monetize their videos with Google-placed ads. 
  • YouTube pays creators a certain rate based on the type of audience their videos attract, and talking about money often can net an influencer more per view than many other topics, according to finance creators.
  • We spoke with several finance influencers on how much money they've made a month, per 100,000 views, and in a single year on YouTube.
  • Subscribe to Business Insider's influencer newsletter: Insider Influencers.

This is the latest installment of Business Insider's YouTube money logs, where creators break down how much they earn.

The attorney Erika Kullberg started her personal-finance YouTube channel one year ago after leaving her job as a corporate lawyer, and she now has about 71,500 subscribers.

Though Kullberg's YouTube channel doesn't have millions of subscribers, she is still able to earn a sizeable amount of money each month because of her video content and the audience her channel attracts. She films videos about personal finance, passive income, investing, and stimulus-package updates.

The audiences these topics attract are valuable to advertisers, who usually pay more money for an informative business-related video than a vlog-style video. In short: Talking about money on YouTube can make creators a lot of it, according to some personal-finance creators like Kullberg. 

Toward the end of April, Kullberg's channel was accepted into YouTube's Partner Program — making May the first month she earned revenue off YouTube, she said. Her channel reached 1.8 million views that month, and her most viewed videos were about the stimulus package.

Business Insider spoke with several finance influencers on how much money they've made per 1,000 ad views, per 100,000 views, in a month, in a year, and the most amount of money they've earned on a single YouTube video.

Here's a comprehensive breakdown of what they said:

Check out some of Business Insider's other posts on how much money YouTube creators make: 

  • $220,000 from YouTube last year: How a personal-finance creator went from filming videos in a Walmart parking lot to a lucrative career

  • How much money a YouTube video with 100,000 views makes, according to 4 creators

  • A recent college grad living in New York says she makes a 6-figure income as a YouTube influencer. She broke down how she does it.

How much advertisers pay YouTube for 1,000 ad views (CPM)

Advertisers on YouTube pay a certain rate for every 1,000 ad views (CPM). YouTube takes 45% of that, and the creator gets the rest.

No creator consistently has the same CPM rate on YouTube, and typically advertisers pay high rates for finance-related videos. The rate can also depend on seasonality, with lower CPM rates at the start of the year and higher ones toward the end, according to creators. 

We spoke with two finance YouTube creators on what their average CPMs were.

Here's what they said:

  • Ruby Asabor (194,000 subscribers) — between $10 and $20, she told Business Insider in February. 
  • Marko Zlatic (439,000 subscribers) — between $20 and $27, he told Business Insider in February. 

Read more: 

16 YouTube stars reveal how much they get paid per 1,000 views

How much YouTube pays for 100,000 views

We spoke with two finance YouTube creators on how much money they earn on average for every 100,000 views.

Here's what they said:

  • Marko Zlatic (439,000 subscribers) — between $1,300 and $1,500, he told Business Insider in February. Zlatic's videos are dedicated to personal finance.
  • Ruby Asabor (194,000 subscribers) — between $2,200 and $2,500, she told Business Insider in February. Asabor makes business and finance videos.

Read more: 

How much money a YouTube video with 100,000 views makes, according to 4 creators

The most money they've made from a single video

Business Insider spoke with three finance creators who shared the most amount of money YouTube has paid them for a single video.

Here's what they said: 

  • Ruby Asabor (194,000 subscribers) — $9,000, she told Business Insider in February. Asabor is a 22-year-old YouTube content creator and motivational speaker.
  • Graham Stephan (2.4 million subscribers) — $56,000, he told Business Insider in March. The video, "How I Bought A Tesla for $78 per month," has 6 million views.
  • Marko Zlatic (439,000 subscribers) — $70,000, he told Business Insider in February. The video, "How Car Dealerships Rip You Off," has 6 million views.

Read more: 

15 YouTube stars reveal the most money they've made from a single video

How much money YouTubers make a month

Business Insider spoke with four finance creators who shared how much YouTube generally pays them per month.

Here's what they said: 

  • Erika Kullberg (71,500 subscribers): $9,000 (May)
  • Graham Stephan (2.4 million subscribers): $141,356 (February)
  • Ryan Scribner (664,000 subscribers): $25,700 (March) and $33,000 (April).
  • Andrei Jikh (924,000 subscribers): $41,080.62 (December)

Read more: 

YouTube creators break down their monthly incomes from the platform

How much money YouTubers make a year (2019)

We spoke with two finance YouTube creators on how much they earned in 2019 from YouTube ads.

Here's what they said: 

  • Andrei Jikh (924,000 subscribers) — $100,000, he told Business Insider in December. 
  • Ryan Scribner (664,000 subscribers) — $220,000, he told Business Insider in May.

Read more: 

A personal-finance influencer earned over $100,000 in his first year from YouTube. He shared his strategy and what he made each month.

$220,000 from YouTube last year: How a personal-finance creator went from filming videos in a Walmart parking lot to a lucrative career

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