Thanks, Travis Tritt, for Accidentally Saving Lives With Your Dumb Covid Policy

Country music fans in Indiana, Mississippi, Illinois, and Kentucky potentially had their lives saved on Monday when everyday hero Travis Tritt canceled four scheduled concerts at venues that enforced certain Covid-19 safety protocols. According to a press release from Tritt’s publicist, the “Here’s a Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares)” singer said he’s placing his two bits on the line.

“I’m putting my money where my mouth is and announcing that any venue or promoter mandating masks, requiring vaccinations, or pushing COVID testing protocols on my fans will not be tolerated,” Tritt said in a statement. “Any show I have booked that discriminates against concert-goers by requiring proof of vaccination, a COVID test, or a mask is being canceled immediately.”

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With those words, Tritt mightily struck down concerts slated for Muncie, Indiana, on October 23rd; Philadelphia, Mississippi, on November 6th; Peoria, Illinois, on November 11th; and Louisville, Kentucky, on November 13th. However, it appears that Tritt has yet to inform the venues themselves: tickets are currently on sale for three of the shows via a link on the singer’s website.

According to his statement, Tritt is decidedly anti-mandate when it comes to the Covid-19 pandemic that has claimed 700,000 U.S. lives and stands in solidarity with those who oppose mandated measures that have been proven to keep people safe.

“Many people are taking a firm stand against these mandates around the country, and I wholeheartedly support that cause. I have been extremely vocal against mandates since the beginning. This is a sacrifice that I’m willing to make to stand up for the freedoms that generations of Americans have enjoyed for their entire lifetimes,” he said, adding that he hopes to reschedule “unrestricted shows” in the affected markets.

Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky, and Mississippi all lag behind the U.S. average of those fully vaccinated. Mississippi, for example, has vaccinated just 44.9 percent of its population according to the New York Times, compared to the national rate of 57.4 percent.

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